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Technical Support after Hours
If technical support is needed after normal office hours, press 2 for emergency 24-hour technical support. Leave a message on the support network, and a qualified technician will contact you immediately. To reach technical support during office hours, you may dial 1-800-595-4945, and then press 1.

E-Mail Technical Support
Clients may reach technical support by e-mail at any time at: techsupport@financialimaging.com.

How soon can I get started?
Get started today by contacting Financial Imaging’s Customer Service at: 1-800-595-4945. We’ll start the process of enrolling your company immediately.

What file formats do you accept?
Due to the high level of security deployed by Financial Imaging, we only acccept except .txt and .csv file formats.

Can I customize my statement?
Absolutely. And Financial Imaging offers design and conversion services if you need special forms, Faxs, or document merge.

How secure is your file transfer/ storage method?
Financial Imaging prides itself on security. Our 256-bit encryption system can ensure complete security for Internet file transfer, and file storage is Secure Socket Encryption SAS70 certification

What happens to the client data after you have processed it?
The data is stored for 365 days, afterwards, it is archived.

How do I know if encryption is enabled or not?
Your Browser (Netscape or Internet Explorer) will tell you. In Netscape versions 3.X and earlier you can tell what kind of encryption is in use for a particular document by looking at the "document" information" screen accessible from the file menu. The little key in the lower left-hand corner of the Netscape window also indicates this information. A solid key with three teeth means 128-bit encryption, a solid key with two teeth means 40-bit encryption, and a broken key means no encryption. Even if your browser supports 128-bit encryption, it may use 40-bit encryption when talking to other servers or to servers outside the U.S. and Canada. In Netscape versions 4.X and higher, click on the "Security" button to determine whether the current page is encrypted, and, if so, what level of encryption is in use. In Microsoft Internet Explorer, a solid padlock will appear on the bottom right of the screen when encryption is in use. To determine whether 40-bit or 128-bit encryption is in effect, open the document information page using File->Properties. This will indicate whether "weak" or "strong" encryption is in use.

How do I know if encryption is enabled or not?
Your Browser (Netscape or Internet Explorer) will tell you. In Netscape versions 3.X and earlier you can tell what kind of encryption is in use for a particular document by looking at the "document" information" screen accessible from the file menu. The little key in the lower left-hand corner of the Netscape window also indicates this information. A solid key with three teeth means 128-bit encryption, a solid key with two teeth means 40-bit encryption, and a broken key means no encryption. Even if your browser supports 128-bit encryption, it may use 40-bit encryption when talking to other servers or to servers outside the U.S. and CanadaIn Netscape versions 4.X and higher, click on the "Security" button to determine whether the current page is encrypted, and, if so, what level of encryption is in use. In Microsoft Internet Explorer, a solid padlock will appear on the bottom right of the screen when encryption is in use. To determine whether 40-bit or 128-bit encryption is in effect, open the document information page using File->Properties. This will indicate whether "weak" or "strong" encryption is in use.

How secure is the encryption used by SSL?
It would take significantly longer than the age of the universe to crack a 128-bit key.SSL uses public-key encryption to exchange a session key between the client and server; this session key is used to encrypt the http transaction (both request and response). Each transaction uses a different session key so that even if someone did manage to decrypt a transaction, that would not mean that they would have found the server's secret key; if they wanted to decrypt another transaction, they'd need to spend as much time and effort on the second transaction as they did on the firstOf course, they would have first have to have figured out some method of intercepting the transaction data in the first place, which is in itself extremely difficult. It would be significantly easier to tap your phone, or to intercept your mail to acquire your credit card number than to somehow intercept and decode Internet Data. Servers and browsers do encryption ranging from a 40-bit secret key to a 128-bit secret key, that is to say '2 to the 40th power' or '2 to the 128th power'Many people have heard that 40-bit is insecure and that you need 128-bit to keep your credit card info safeThey feel that using a 40-bit key is insecure because it's vulnerable to a "brute force" attack (basically trying each of the 2^40 possible keys until you find the one that decrypts the message). This was in fact demonstrated when a French researcher used a network of fast workstations to crack a 40-bit encrypted message in a little over a weekOf course, even this 'vulnerability' is not really applicable to applications like an online credit card transaction, since the transaction is completed in a few momentsIf a network of fast computers takes a week to crack a 40-bit key, you'd be completed your transaction and long gone before the hacker even got started. Of course, using a 128-bit key eliminates any problem at all because there are 2^128 instead of 2^40 possible keys. Using the same method (a networked of fast workstations) to crack a message encrypted with such a key would take significantly longer than the age of the universe using conventional technology. Remember that 128-bit is not just 'three times' as powerful as 40-bit encryption2^128 is 'two times two, times two, times two...' with 128 two's That is two, doubled on itself 128 times. 2^40 is already a HUGE number, about a trillion (that's a million, million!)Therefor 2^128 is that number (a trillion), doubled over and over on itself another 88 times Again, it would take significantly longer than the age of the universe to crack a 128-bit key.